DeutschEnglish

Submenu

 - - - By CrazyStat - - -

28. June 2016

flashplugin-installer cannot download files using unattended-upgrades on Ubuntu

Filed under: Linux — Tags: , , , , , , — Christopher Kramer @ 10:29

Using unattended-upgrades on Ubuntu  16.04 (and previous versions) set up to install updates on shutdown, flashplugin-installer always failed when downloading the new version. The reason probably is that on shutdown, the Internet connection is not available anymore. Up to now, I always updated flashplugin-installer manually. But today, I found a nice and simple solution:

Just get rid of the installer! In the Cononical partner repository, there is a package that directly contains the flash plugin. First, make sure you include the partner repository in your /etc/apt/sources.list, e.g. for xenial:

deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu xenial partner
deb-src http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu xenial partner

Then, update, get rid of the flashplugin-installer, and install the adobe-flashplugin instead:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get remove flashplugin-installer
sudo apt-get install adobe-flashplugin

Hope this helps someone who also has problems with unattended upgrades and falshplugin-installer.

Recommendation

Try my Open Source PHP visitor analytics script CrazyStat.

13. August 2014

Icinga: Monitor refused mails in postfix mailqueue

Filed under: Linux,Server Administration — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — Christopher Kramer @ 12:09

In case your server gets listed on blacklists, mails will get refused by destination servers and stick in the deferred mail queue for some time until the sender finally gets a mailer daemon.

As it takes some time until the sender gets the mailer daemon and informs the server admin, it would be better if you could directly get notified by Icinga/Nagios when a mail is in the deferred queue because the destination server refused it.

Therefore I wrote a small shell script which I want to share with you here. I am assuming Debian Wheezy with Icinga and a postfix mailserver.

Create the shell script with the actual plugin in

/usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_mailq_blacklist :
#!/bin/sh
# detects if mails in mail queue were refused by destination server (because of blacklist?)
# From http://blog.christosoft.de/2014/08/icinga-monitor-refused-mails-postfix-mailqueue/
# Version: 2017-03-07

if mailq | grep -qP "(refused to talk to me(?!(.*out of connection slots)))|(unsolicited mail originating from your IP)|(temporarily deferred due to user complaints)"
then
  mails=`mailq | grep -oP "(refused to talk to me(?!(.*out of connection slots)))|(unsolicited mail originating from your IP)|(temporarily deferred due to user complai$
  echo "$mails mail(s) were refused, check mailq!"
  if [ "$mails" -le 10 ] && [ "$mails" -gt 1 ]; then
    # 2-10 mails -> warning
    echo "\nWarning. | refused=$mails;2;11;0"
    return 1;
  fi
  if [ "$mails" -gt 10 ]; then
    # more than 10 mails -> critical
    echo "\nCriticial! | refused=$mails;2;11;0"
    return 2;
  fi
  return 1;
else
  echo "Ok, there seems to be no refused mail in the mailq | refused=0;2;11;0"
  exit 0;
fi

This will check for the texts “refused to talk to me” (not followed by “out of connection slots”) and “unsolicited mail originating from your IP” in the mailq output. These are the most common errors you get when the destination server has your server’s IP blacklisted.  In case at least one mail was refused, this causes a warning state in icinga. If more than 10 mails were refused, it causes a critical state.

Now you need to make this script executable:

chmod +x /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_mailq_blacklist

Now create the config file for the plugin in

/etc/nagios-plugins/config/mailq_blacklist.cfg :
# 'check_mailq_blacklist' command definition
define command{
        command_name    check_mailq_blacklist
        command_line    /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_mailq_blacklist
}

So now we have the command and need to define a service that uses it. Let’s say we use this locally for localhost. In

/etc/icinga/objects/localhost_icinga.cfg

add:

define service{
        use                             generic-service
        host_name                       localhost
        service_description             Mail Queue Refused Mail
        check_command                   check_mailq_blacklist
        }

This is it, just restart icinga and you are done:

service icinga restart

I hope this is of use to somebody.

Of course it is also useful to monitor in Icinga, if you are on some of the most used blacklists. A script to do this can be found here.

30. January 2013

Nagios / Icinga: Monitor (local) memory usage

Filed under: Linux,Server Administration — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , — Christopher Kramer @ 17:55

Nagios and its fork icinga are great monitoring tools. They come with a bundle of plugins to monitor standard services such as HTTP, SMTP, POP3, load and stuff like that. And there are lots of 3rd party plugins available for almost everything else you can think of.

But one standard thing that is missing in the official nagios-plugins package is a plugin to check memory usage (of the local machine).

So here is how to install one. I assume a Debian system with Icinga running – you might want to adjust paths for other distros or nagios.

  1. Download the plugin here
    e.g. from the shell:

    wget https://exchange.icinga.com/exchange/check_memory/files/784/check_memory.pl
  2. Then move the file to the other plugins
    mv check_memory.pl /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_memory.pl
  3. Make it executable
    chmod +x /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_memory.pl
  4. Try to run it:
    perl /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_memory.pl -w 50% -c 25%
  5. This should give something like “CHECK_MEMORY OK – […] free […]”. If an error occurs, you probably need to install the perl module Nagios::Plugin. On Debian, the easiest way is:
    apt-get install libnagios-plugin-perl

    On other distros, you might use CPAN:

    perl -MCPAN -e 'install Nagios::Plugin'

    This will ask you lots of questions and install lots of dependencies (where you should say “yes”).

  6. Configure the check_memory command. To do this, create a file /etc/nagios-plugins/config/memory.cfg with this content:
    # 'check_memory' command definition
    define command{
            command_name    check_memory
            command_line    perl /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_memory.pl -w $ARG1$ -c $ARG2$
            }
  7. Now you can use the check_memory command to define a service. For example, add this to /etc/icinga/objects/localhost_icinga.cfg (assuming you define localhost-services there):
    define service{
            use                             generic-service
            host_name                       localhost
            service_description             Memory
            check_command                   check_memory!50%!25%
            }

    This will send you a warning when memory usage is 50% and critical when only 25% is free. You might want to adjust these values of course depending on what is normal on your system and how early you want to be notified.

  8. Check your configuration:
    /usr/local/icinga/bin/icinga -v /etc/icinga/icinga.cfg
  9. Restart Icinga / Nagios if the preflight-check was okay:
    /etc/init.d/icinga restart

This should be it.

I hope this helped somebody.

To monitor memory usage of a remote server, you’ll need SNMP for example. Maybe I’ll post another blog post on this soon.

15. February 2012

WordPress: Frontend and Backend in different Language

Filed under: Wordpress — Tags: , , , , , — Christopher Kramer @ 23:45

In case you want to use a different language for the wordpress frontend (your blog) and the backend (admin panel), here is a tip how it can be done.

Step 1: Set frontend language

Configure the language of WordPress for the language you want your frontend in. You do this in wp_config.php using the constant WPLANG:

define ('WPLANG', '');

This unsets the language, meaning the frontend will be English. This also works if you use a localized version of wordpress. If you want to set another language, do so:

define ('WPLANG', 'de_DE');

This would set the language to German. You need to have a corresponding .mo-file in wp-content/languages (in this example, wp-content/languages/de_DE.mo).

Step 2: Set the backend language

Step one will also affect the backend. If you want to have the backend in another language, there is a neat little plugin which changes the backend language for you, which I found on this forum.

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Change backend language
Version: 0.5
Plugin URI: http://forum.wordpress-deutschland.org/konfiguration/32642-frontend-soll-englisch-sein-adminbereich-deutsch-engl-od-deut-download-nehmen.html
Description: Changes the backend language
Author: Oliver Schlöbe
Author URI: http://www.schloebe.de/
*/

function os_setAdminLang($locale) {
    if( WP_ADMIN === true ) {
        $locale = 'de_DE';
        return $locale;
    }
}

add_filter('locale', 'os_setAdminLang', 1, 1);
?>

This changes the backend language to German. In case you want another language, change ‘de_DE’ to the desired language in line 13. You need a corresponding .mo-file just like for the frontend.

Save this as something like wp-content/plugins/change_be_language.php

Then active the plugin in your backend and your backend will turn into the language you set.

Attention: Make sure there are no extra spaces in the plugin-file. Especially at the end, some editors tend to add spaces or line breaks. This will result in problems (headers cannot be sent etc.).

Hope someone finds this useful.

Update: Just found out, that the author wrote a blog post himself about this (English text at the bottom of the page)…